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⭐️ Kazi Radio FM

6 Albums 17 Tracks
⭐️ Kazi Radio FM — Mix
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⭐️ Kazi Radio FM — Jazz
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⭐️ Kazi Radio FM — Lounge
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⭐️ Kazi Radio FM — Zen
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⭐️ Kazi Radio FM — Soul
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⭐️ Kazi Radio FM — Malouf
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  • ⭐️ Extrait de la chaîne Kazi Radio FM – 2H de musique Toronto
  • ⭐️ Kazi Radio FM – Jazz – San Francisco
  • ⭐️ Kazi Radio FM Smooth Jazz Florida

    ⭐️ Jazz is a music genre that originated in the African-American communities of New Orleans, United States. It originated in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and developed from roots in blues and ragtime. Jazz is seen by many as « America’s classical music ». Since the 1920s Jazz Age, jazz has become recognized as a major form of musical expression. It then emerged in the form of independent traditional and popular musical styles, all linked by the common bonds of African-American and European-American musical parentage with a performance orientation. Jazz is characterized by swing and blue notes, call and response vocals, polyrhythms and improvisation. Jazz has roots in West African cultural and musical expression, and in African-American music traditions including blues and ragtime, as well as European military band music. Intellectuals around the world have hailed jazz as « one of America’s original art forms ».

    As jazz spread around the world, it drew on national, regional, and local musical cultures, which gave rise to different styles. New Orleans jazz began in the early 1910s, combining earlier brass-band marches, French quadrilles, biguine, ragtime and blues with collective polyphonic improvisation. In the 1930s, heavily arranged dance-oriented swing big bands, Kansas City jazz, a hard-swinging, bluesy, improvisational style and Gypsy jazz (a style that emphasized musette waltzes) were the prominent styles. Bebop emerged in the 1940s, shifting jazz from danceable popular music toward a more challenging « musician’s music » which was played at faster tempos and used more chord-based improvisation. Cool jazz developed near the end of the 1940s, introducing calmer, smoother sounds and long, linear melodic lines.

    The 1950s saw the emergence of free jazz, which explored playing without regular meter, beat and formal structures, and in the mid-1950s, hard bop emerged, which introduced influences from rhythm and blues, gospel, and blues, especially in the saxophone and piano playing. Modal jazz developed in the late 1950s, using the mode, or musical scale, as the basis of musical structure and improvisation. Jazz-rock fusion appeared in the late 1960s and early 1970s, combining jazz improvisation with rock music’s rhythms, electric instruments, and highly amplified stage sound. In the early 1980s, a commercial form of jazz fusion called smooth jazz became successful, garnering significant radio airplay. Other styles and genres abound in the 2000s, such as Latin and Afro-Cuban jazz.

    Etymology and definition

    The origin of the word jazz has resulted in considerable research, and its history is well documented. It is believed to be related to jasm, a slang term dating back to 1860 meaning « pep, energy ». The earliest written record of the word is in a 1912 article in the Los Angeles Times in which a minor league baseball pitcher described a pitch which he called a « jazz ball » « because it wobbles and you simply can’t do anything with it ».

    The use of the word in a musical context was documented as early as 1915 in the Chicago Daily Tribune. Its first documented use in a musical context in New Orleans was in a November 14, 1916 Times-Picayune article about « jas bands ». In an interview with NPR, musician Eubie Blake offered his recollections of the slang connotations of the term, saying, « When Broadway picked it up, they called it ‘J-A-Z-Z’. It wasn’t called that. It was spelled ‘J-A-S-S’. That was dirty, and if you knew what it was, you wouldn’t say it in front of ladies. » The American Dialect Society named it the Word of the 20th Century.

    Jazz is difficult to define because it encompasses a wide range of music spanning a period of over 100 years, from ragtime to the rock-infused fusion. Attempts have been made to define jazz from the perspective of other musical traditions, such as European music history or African music. But critic Joachim-Ernst Berendt argues that its terms of reference and its definition should be broader, defining jazz as a « form of art music which originated in the United States through the confrontation of the Negro with European music » and arguing that it differs from European music in that jazz has a « special relationship to time defined as ‘swing' ». Jazz involves « a spontaneity and vitality of musical production in which improvisation plays a role » and contains a « sonority and manner of phrasing which mirror the individuality of the performing jazz musician ». In the opinion of Robert Christgau, « most of us would say that inventing meaning while letting loose is the essence and promise of jazz ».

    A broader definition that encompasses different eras of jazz has been proposed by Travis Jackson: « it is music that includes qualities such as swing, improvising, group interaction, developing an ‘individual voice’, and being open to different musical possibilities ». Krin Gibbard argued that « jazz is a construct » which designates « a number of musics with enough in common to be understood as part of a coherent tradition ». In contrast to commentators who have argued for excluding types of jazz, musicians are sometimes reluctant to define the music they play. Duke Ellington, one of jazz’s most famous figures, said, « It’s all music. »

    Elements and issues

    Improvisation

    Although jazz is considered difficult to define, in part because it contains many subgenres, improvisation is one of its defining elements. The centrality of improvisation is attributed to the influence of earlier forms of music such as blues, a form of folk music which arose in part from the work songs and field hollers of African-American slaves on plantations. These work songs were commonly structured around a repetitive call-and-response pattern, but early blues was also improvisational. Classical music performance is evaluated more by its fidelity to the musical score, with less attention given to interpretation, ornamentation, and accompaniment. The classical performer’s goal is to play the composition as it was written. In contrast, jazz is often characterized by the product of interaction and collaboration, placing less value on the contribution of the composer, if there is one, and more on the performer. The jazz performer interprets a tune in individual ways, never playing the same composition twice. Depending on the performer’s mood, experience, and interaction with band members or audience members, the performer may change melodies, harmonies, and time signatures.

    In early Dixieland, a.k.a. New Orleans jazz, performers took turns playing melodies and improvising countermelodies. In the swing era of the 1920s–’40s, big bands relied more on arrangements which were written or learned by ear and memorized. Soloists improvised within these arrangements. In the bebop era of the 1940s, big bands gave way to small groups and minimal arrangements in which the melody was stated briefly at the beginning and most of the song was improvised. Modal jazz abandoned chord progressions to allow musicians to improvise even more. In many forms of jazz, a soloist is supported by a rhythm section of one or more chordal instruments (piano, guitar), double bass, and drums. The rhythm section plays chords and rhythms that outline the song structure and complement the soloist. In avant-garde and free jazz, the separation of soloist and band is reduced, and there is license, or even a requirement, for the abandoning of chords, scales, and meters.

    Tradition and race

    Since the emergence of bebop, forms of jazz that are commercially oriented or influenced by popular music have been criticized. According to Bruce Johnson, there has always been a « tension between jazz as a commercial music and an art form ». Traditional jazz enthusiasts have dismissed bebop, free jazz, and jazz fusion as forms of debasement and betrayal. An alternative view is that jazz can absorb and transform diverse musical styles. By avoiding the creation of norms, jazz allows avant-garde styles to emerge.

    For some African Americans, jazz has drawn attention to African-American contributions to culture and history. For others, jazz is a reminder of « an oppressive and racist society and restrictions on their artistic visions ». Amiri Baraka argues that there is a « white jazz » genre that expresses whiteness. White jazz musicians appeared in the midwest and in other areas throughout the U.S. Papa Jack Laine, who ran the Reliance band in New Orleans in the 1910s, was called « the father of white jazz ». The Original Dixieland Jazz Band, whose members were white, were the first jazz group to record, and Bix Beiderbecke was one of the most prominent jazz soloists of the 1920s. The Chicago Style was developed by white musicians such as Eddie Condon, Bud Freeman, Jimmy McPartland, and Dave Tough. Others from Chicago such as Benny Goodman and Gene Krupa became leading members of swing during the 1930s. Many bands included both black and white musicians. These musicians helped change attitudes toward race in the U.S.

     

  • ⭐️ Kazi Radio FM — Mix
  • ⭐️ Kazi Radio FM Zen
  • ⭐️ Kazi Radio FM Soul
  • ⭐️ Kazi Radio FM Andalus
  • ⭐️ Extrait de Andia : Sabes tu … sur Kazi Radio FM Toronto

    Artiste : Diana Constantin (Andia)
    Andia : Sabes tu …
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    Lyrics ♪
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    Sabes tu, te digo
    You’re my lo, lo, lo, lo, lo love
    Sabes tu yo lo se
    You’re my lo, lo, lo, lo, lo love

    Sabes tu, te digo
    You’re my lo, lo, lo, lo, lo love
    Sabes tu yo lo se
    You’re my lo, lo, lo, lo, lo love

    Hold me tight
    I’ve been waiting so long for
    You’re touch, you’re smile
    Since you left I’ve been lonely so
    Hold me like
    it’s the last night together so
    Hold me tight
    Only you make me feel alive
    You’re my love, you’re my love, take me higher
    Stay with me, never leave my desire
    Don’t you know my heart burns like fire
    You, re my love, you, re my love, take me higher
    Stay with me, always be my desire
    Don’t you know my heart burns like fire

    Sabes tu, te digo
    You’re my lo, lo, lo, lo, lo love
    Sabes tu yo lo se
    You’re my lo, lo, lo, lo, lo love
    Sabes tu, te digo
    You’re my lo, lo, lo, lo, lo love
    Sabes tu yo lo se
    You’re my lo, lo, lo, lo, lo love

    You and I
    We’re like wind, we’re like fire
    We laugh and cry
    Something keeps us together
    So close, so fine
    I can’t think of no other to spend this time
    Only you make me feel alive
    You, re my love, you, re my love, take me higher
    Stay with me, always be my desire
    Don’t you know my heart burns like fire

    Sabes tu, te digo
    You’re my lo, lo, lo, lo, lo love
    Sabes tu yo lo se
    You’re my lo, lo, lo, lo, lo love
    Sabes tu, te digo
    You’re my lo, lo, lo, lo, lo love
    Sabes tu yo lo se
    You’re my lo, lo, lo, lo, lo love

    x2

  • ⭐️ Djazairy Sahara
  • ⭐️ Chaàbi
  • ⭐️ Chaîne 3
  • ⭐️ Malouf
  • ⭐️ Kazi Radio FM — Lounge
  • ⭐️ Kazi Radio FM Fun 45s
  • ⭐️ Kazi Radio FM Smooth Jazz Tampa
  • ⭐️ Kazi Radio FM Blues
  • ⭐️ Kazi Radio FM Life Chill Music